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demo-attachment-37-Subtraction-3

Benefits:

  • Provides the body with 400 mg of magnesium
  • Decrease/reduce duration of mild migraine*
  • Prevention and treatment of magnesium and its nutritional deficiencies**
  • Supports muscle health
  • Supports healthy cardiovascular system function
  • Helps promote bone health
  • Ideal for diets lacking in dairy and dark green leafy vegetables
  • Highly bioavailable due to the forms of magnesium coupled with our superior Isotonix delivery
    system
  • This vegan product contains no added wheat, soy, yeast, gluten, artificial flavour, salt,
    preservatives or milk
  • Great tasting orange flavour

* If symptoms persist consult your healthcare practitioner
**Vitamins and/or mineral supplements should not replace a balanced diet.

Product Classifications:

  Gluten-Free The finished product contains no detectable gluten (<10ppm gluten)
  Vegan – This product is vegan
  Isotonic- Capable Drinkable Supplements – Easy-to-swallow supplements in liquid form are immediately available to the body for absorption
  Quality Standards – GMP Operations and Standardised Ingredients
  Checked For: Heavy Metals, Microbiological Contaminants, Allergens, Potency, Purity and Identity

Compare:

There are numerous magnesium supplements on the market today, but only Isotonix Magnesium combines a formula blending two different types of magnesium in an isotonic form for maximum absorption by the body with amazing value. Like calcium, magnesium is most impactful when taken in different forms. Magnesium bound to different amino acids like glycine and citrate allow the mineral to benefit multiple areas of the body. Magnesium in any form is beneficial; however, some of the best forms are citrate and glycinate.

Both glycinate and citrate are gentle on the gastrointestinal tract while other forms like oxide have greater potential to be a laxative.
Magnesium, the fourth most abundant mineral in the body, is necessary for hundreds of functions.
However, the average adult doesn’t typically get enough of this important nutrient. For less than a two dollars a day, Isotonix Magnesium provides 400 mg of magnesium, an amount other products you see can’t match. Don’t be misled by competitors who advertise high numbers of magnesium compounds, what matters is that it has 400mg of elemental magnesium. Plus, with the revolutionary Isotonix Delivery System compared to a basic powder or tablet, you’re giving your body what it needs and how it needs it, with a more highly bioavailable product.

Why Choose Isotonix Magnesium?

Isotonix Magnesium is a great tasting formula providing the body with 400 mg of magnesium in a highlybioavailable formula. Thanks to its unique formula, which includes two different types of magnesium [Citrate and Glycinate] to increase its absorption by the body, Isotonix Magnesium helps promote bone health, supports healthy cardiovascular system function, while reducing duration of mild migraine , supporting muscle health and preventing or treating any magnesium nutritional deficiencies. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and supports more than 300 enzyme systems. It is required for energy, regulation of the body temperature, nerve function, adaptation to stress, metabolism and much more.
One of the main mechanisms of magnesium in the body is its support of normal protein synthesis. Normal protein synthesis relies on optimal magnesium concentrations, as magnesium supports the normal delivery to the building blocks of life – our DNA – of signals that trigger the expression of amino acids. In other words, this process supports the body’s normal ability to “make” proteins.
The recommended daily intake for adults, established by the Australian government ranges from 310-420 mg per day. However, average daily intakes are much less. According to a CSIRO study approximately 50% of Australian men and 39% of Australian women are not getting enough Magnesium in their diet.

Very important to know that Magnesium deficiency is often misdiagnosed because it does not show up in blood tests because only 1% of the body’s magnesium is stored in the blood. Magnesium deficiency can occur due to many reasons such as too much or not enough dietary protein, vomiting or diarrhoea, longstanding stress, ageing, strenuous exercise, or having a high alcohol, salt, or caffeine consumption.
Unfortunately, if magnesium deficiency does occur, these inadequate levels of magnesium have been linked to poorer concentration, memory and cognitive function and muscle discomfort. Sleep quality is associated with higher levels of magnesium and when these levels are low, sleep quality may suffer.

Isotonix Delivery System:

Magnesium (Citrate & Glycinate): 400 mg Magnesium is a component of the mineralised part of bone and supports the normal metabolism of
potassium and calcium in adults. It helps maintain normal levels of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, adrenaline and insulin. It also promotes the normal mobilisation of calcium, transporting it inside the cell for further utilisation.

It plays a key role in supporting the normal functioning of muscle and nervous tissue. Magnesium promotes the normal synthesis of all proteins, nucleic acids, nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, lipids and carbohydrates.
Magnesium is required for release of energy and it promotes the normal regulation of body temperature and proper nerve function, it helps the body handle stress, and it promotes a healthy metabolism.
Magnesium works together with calcium to help maintain the normal regulation of the heart and blood pressure. Importantly, magnesium also supports the body’s ability to build healthy bones and teeth, and Magnesium (Citrate & Glycinate): 400 mg
Magnesium is a component of the mineralised part of bone and supports the normal metabolism of
potassium and calcium in adults. It helps maintain normal levels of potassium, phosphorus, calcium,
adrenaline and insulin. It also promotes the normal mobilisation of calcium, transporting it inside the cell
for further utilisation. It plays a key role in supporting the normal functioning of muscle and nervous tissue. Magnesium promotes the normal synthesis of all proteins, nucleic acids, nucleotides, cyclic
adenosine monophosphate, lipids and carbohydrates.
Magnesium is required for release of energy and it promotes the normal regulation of body temperature and proper nerve function, it helps the body handle stress, and it promotes a healthy metabolism.
Magnesium works together with calcium to help maintain the normal regulation of the heart and blood
pressure. Importantly, magnesium also supports the body’s ability to build healthy bones and teeth, and promotes proper muscle development. It works together with calcium and vitamin D to help keep bones strong. Magnesium also promotes cardiovascular health by supporting normal platelet activity.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What benefits does magnesium provide the body?

With its involvement in supporting over 300 enzyme reactions, magnesium plays roles in many aspects of
health. It is required for normal energy release, regulation of the body temperature, nerve function,
adaptation to stress and metabolism.
With regards to bone health, it is an important component of the mineralised part of bone and supports
the normal metabolism of calcium and potassium in adults. Magnesium works together with calcium and
vitamin D to help keep bones strong and support bone mineral density.
Magnesium also supports muscle development and movement and the transmission of nerve impulses to
the muscles. Studies clearly demonstrate the effects of supplemental magnesium on muscular health.
Adequate magnesium levels are also important for cardiovascular health.
Studies show magnesium supports a regular heartbeat, thus promoting a healthy heart. Additionally,
magnesium helps maintain normal blood pressure.

How much magnesium should I be getting, and why do I need a magnesium supplement
versus getting it from my normal diet?

The recommended daily intake for adults, established by the Australian government ranges from 310-420
mg per day. See chart below.

Men
19-30 yr 330 mg/day 400 mg/day
31-50 yr 350 mg/day 420 mg/day
51-70 yr 350 mg/day 420 mg/day
>70 yr 350 mg/day 420 mg/day

Women
19-30 yr 255 mg/day 310 mg/day
31-50 yr 265 mg/day 320 mg/day
51-70 yr 265 mg/day 320 mg/day
>70 yr 265 mg/day 320 mg/day

https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/magnesium

Daily lifestyle factors and poor dietary choices adversely affect the amount of magnesium we are ingesting. Foods rich in magnesium include whole grains, nuts and green vegetables, which are potent sources of magnesium because of their chlorophyll content. Meats, starches, dairy products and refined and processed foods – which make up a large portion of the typical diet in today’s society – contain low amounts of magnesium.

High-fat diets not only provide lesser amounts of magnesium, but studies have shown that such a diet might even cause less magnesium to be absorbed by the body.
Even with a proper, balanced diet, the amount of nutrients in foods today vastly differs from those of even a generation ago. In addition, food preparation methods may decrease the magnesium content of food. For these reasons, it is important to help balance our diets with nutritional supplements that can provide additional nutritional assistance.

Why were these forms of magnesium (citrate and glycinate) chosen?

Both of these forms of magnesium were carefully chosen based on the latest scientific rationale, as they have been shown to have excellent oral absorption rates and work well within the Isotonix® delivery system.

Does this product need to be taken on an empty stomach?

Yes. For maximum absorption, the product should be taken on an empty stomach.

Is there anyone who should not take this product?

Anyone who has an ongoing medical condition, is pregnant or breastfeeding, or is taking prescription medication should speak with their healthcare provider before taking this product. Also, magnesium should be used cautiously by those with reduced kidney function.

What other health & nutrition products would complement Isotonix Magnesium?

The benefits of Isotonix Magnesium are complemented by Isotonix OPC-3®, Isotonix Calcium Plus, and Heart Health Omega III Fish Oil.

Scientific Support:

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  • Inna Slutsky
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